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Juliet Fitzgibbons

Juliet Fitzgibbons

Juliet joins Fall River as an Account Executive and brings over 15 years of prior broker and account management experience. Her experience brings extensive knowledge on employee benefit programs, account management and creative cost-saving strategies and compliance solutions for employers of various sizes.

She is responsible for new business proposals, client renewals including plan benchmarking, rate analysis and mid-year reviews. She helps clients navigate healthcare systems and educates employers and employees through open enrollment meetings and day-to-day service requests. Juliet joined Fall River in 2015.

 
 Guest Article by Kristen Deevy, Managing Director of Strategic Retirement Partners
 
On Feb. 3, 2017, President Trump drafted a memorandum to the DOL, directing that they delay implementation of the Conflict of Interest Rule (The Rule) for at least 180 days. The Rule, which was set to take effect on April 10, 2017, expands ERISA’s definition of “fiduciary” under retirement plans by identifying additional forms of communication that would constitute investment advice and would deem the giver of such advice a fiduciary under ERISA. 
Wednesday, 25 January 2017 20:13

Update on ACA Repeal and Replace Strategy

It was no secret before President Trump signed the executive order that he wanted the Affordable Care Act (ACA) repealed, and now he has made his intentions clear. His first signed executive order requires federal agencies to ease the economic burden of the ACA “to the maximum extent permitted by law” until it is repealed. Although the executive order doesn’t grant the administration any powers that it didn’t already have, it does signal to the public that change is coming. 

Monday, 21 November 2016 15:13

1095 Reporting Changes and Delays

Not long after indicating that there would be no exceptions to the January 31st deadline for 1095 B & C forms, the federal government reversed itself. You may have heard there are several delays and changes that have been announced for this year’s reporting:

On January 1, 2017, new wellness program rules from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) go into effect. These rules differ a bit from those under HIPAA and the ACA, so we recommend every employer review and revise their wellness program to ensure compliance, including new rules around incentives, new limitations on the types of info gathered in Health Risk Assessments on family members, and newly required notices you must provide to employees.

Tuesday, 06 September 2016 20:08

Important Medicare Part D Deadline October 15th

The Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) requires Employers with prescription drug coverage to complete two items each year regarding Medicare Part D.  The first deadline is October 15th annually, and the other is 60 days from the beginning of each new plan year.  
The only employers exempt from this requirement are those that are small enough to be certain that their plan does not cover anyone eligible for Medicare such as employees or spouses over 65, anyone in end stage renal failure, or any disabled individuals. If you’re not positive – we recommend you comply to be safe.  

On July 11, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced a proposal to implement significant changes to the forms and regulations that govern annual employee benefit plan reporting on Form 5500. 
 
Most notably, the revisions would require companies of any size or funding arrangement to file a Form 5500 as well as add a new Schedule J (Group Health Plan Information) to the Form 5500. 
 
The proposed changes, which were published in the Federal Register on July 21, 2016, would considerably increase the annual reporting obligations for nearly all health and welfare plans. The revised reporting requirements, if adopted, would apply for plan years beginning on and after January 1, 2019.  
Effective June 27, 2016, the Colorado Medicaid program is now called Health First Colorado. The new name reflects the significant changes that have been made to modernize Colorado’s Medicaid program to engage members and improve the quality and coordination of care. The name itself – Health First Colorado – aims to convey Colorado’s commitment to putting its residents’ health first, as well as encourage its 1.3 million members to put their own health first.
Traveling abroad for work can be an exciting experience but anything can happen while you're away from home. Losing your passport, malaria, auto accident, food poisoning – it's important to be prepared for any unexpected illness, injury or medical emergency. Unfortunately, most domestic medical plans reimburse after the fact for emergencies only, and simply are not designed for regular international travel. 
 
It’s no secret that the quality of healthcare can vary widely around the world. The quality of care your expatriate employees experience in their new country may not be to the standard they were used to back home, nor are they likely entitled to any free or subsidized national healthcare. As an international employer, it’s important to provide the proper type of medical coverage for your employees. You want to ensure that they receive worldwide access to quality care, superior international claims administration, and 24-7 translation, logistics, and medical evacuation service. 
THE FACTS
What is Amendment 69?
Also known as ColoradoCare, Amendment 69 is a single-payer healthcare initiative that will create a government run, universal healthcare system in Colorado. Due to appear on the 2016 general election ballot, the passage of Amendment 69 would eliminate private health insurance and subsidies provided through Colorado’s insurance exchange and funding for Medicaid.
 
Who is responsible for assuring care?
As consumers, we spend so much time focusing on medical benefits and sometimes forget the importance of disability coverage. Although many states do not require that employers offer any type of disability benefit to its employees, there are a handful of states that mandate employers to offer paid-Short-Term Disability (STD) benefits for employees. STD benefits are not available from Social Security or elsewhere in the federal government. If you are disabled less than a year, you can’t collect Social Security disability or State Disability Insurance (SDI).
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